In Eric Ries’ latest post over at Startup Lessons Learned, he addresses many of the most common objections he’s heard regarding continuous deployment.  According to Eric, most of the objections boil down to the following two points:

      1. That mission critical customers won’t accept new releases on a continuous basis.
      2. That continuous deployment leads to lower quality software than software built in large batches.

I think he addresses both of these points extremely well and goes further in illustrating the improvements that continuous deployment brings to an organization:

  1. Faster (and better) feedback. 
  2. More automation. 
  3. Monitoring of real-world metrics.
  4. Better handling of intermittent bugs. 
  5. Smaller batches

Be sure not to miss out on the great discussions in the comments thread as well.   One comment Eric made that really stood out to me was his mention that the dichotomy between “fewer, more stable releases” and “faster, less stable releases” is a false one and that what continuous deployment truly brings to an organization is faster and more stable releases.  

This reminded me of a lot of objections I’ve heard regarding Lean in that doing the right thing up front (building infrastructure, identifying and planning around your constraints, etc.) will give you better quality but slower development; in fact the truth (as borne out both in manufacturing and software development) that doing the right thing up front may cost more initially but you’ll end up letting people work faster while also increasing quality and customer value over the life of the project.

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